21 July 2012

Scarlet – By: A.C. Gaughen (Teen Fiction)



This is a new take on Will Scarlet, the cheeky thief who is the best friend of none other than Robin Hood. Unbeknownst to all of Nottingham he also just happens to be a she.  As their crew tries desperately to fight the evils around them, they are pressed even harder by the evil Sir Gisbourne, a dark figure in Scarlet’s past life.   

 I loved the mystery of Scarlet’s past, and her strength as a character. This was a great read, fully able to stand up to the Legend of Robin Hood.

Bookwyrm Rating: Meat and Potatoes

15 July 2012

One for the Murphys – By: Linda Mullaly Hunt (Teen Fiction)




After an extremely distressing incident our protagonist is placed in foster care with an idyllic family. The situation couldn't be more different from her own troubled home life, so naturally she has some trouble adjusting to the changes. During her time with the Murphys she learns a little bit about life and a lot about herself.

I loved this story; it’s neither “sunshine & roses” or “doom & gloom”, but a life-like combination of highs and lows. Each new development raises and issue that I had to think about for myself and it’s presented in such a way that the reader is encouraged to really consider each turn of events. It sends you away thinking, and that’s a good thing.

Bookwyrm Rating: Vegetables

11 July 2012

We Learn Nothing: Essays and Cartoons – By: Tim Kreider (Nonfiction)



On the whole, I find collections of essays to be tedious at best and at worst they’re sermons where so-and-so “figured it all out” and now he wants to tell you all about it. This collection was a wonderful kind of slap in the face for being so cynical.

So here’s why I liked it:

There is a dark underlying mood to these essays which are written with both wry humor and unusual candor. Both of these appeal to me, when people take themselves too seriously it is a bad sign. Topics range from close encounters of the fatal kind, to transgendered friends and the novelty of family. As a reader you won’t get bogged down.  There wasn’t an essay that I didn’t enjoy, but there were several that I reread because I enjoyed both the prose and the message enough to go back for seconds.

Bookwyrm Rating: Meat & Potatoes with a side of Vegetables

02 July 2012

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter – By: Seth Grahame Smith (Fiction)




I’ll admit it; I saw the movie trailer first and thought “Oooh that looks like fun”. But, to be fair, it really is fun. Now it’s obvious to me how all of the bad things that happened in Abe Lincoln’s life were caused by vampires, I don’t know how I missed it.

I loved how matter-of-fact the book was.  Narrated as a history textbook, the story contains all of the familiar Lincoln stories with one itsy-bitsy change; there are a few undead power players. The story is so familiar, it seems like you should know where the story is going, but that’s where the author fools you. It is his story from top to bottom.

Bookwyrm Rating: Dessert